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Microcrystaline Wax

Microcrystaline Wax is a type of wax produced by de-oiling petrolatum, as part of the petroleum refining process. Unlike the more familiar paraffin wax which contains mostly unbranched alkanes, microcrystalline wax containing a higher percentage of isoparaffinic ( branched ) hydrocarbons and naphthenic hydrocarbons. It is characterized by subtlety different crystals with larger crystals of paraffin wax. It consists of a high molecular weight saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons. It is generally darker, thicker, denser, tackier and more elastic than paraffin wax, and has a molecular weight and a melting point higher. Elastic and adhesive characteristics of microcrystalline wax associated with non straight chain components that it contains. Microcrystalline wax crystal structure of a typical small and thin, making them more flexible than paraffin wax. It is commonly used in cosmetic formulations.

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Microcrystaline Wax
Microcrystaline Wax
Microcrystalline wax is often used in industries such as the tire and rubber, candles, adhesives, corrugated board, cosmetics, castings, and a host of others. Refineries may also utilize blending facilities to combine paraffin and microcrystalline waxes. This type of activity is prevalent especially for industries such as tire and rubber.
Microcrystalline waxes have considerable application in the custom making of jewelry and small sculptures. Different formulations produce waxes from those soft enough to be molded by hand to those hard enough to be carved with rotary tools. The melted wax can be cast to make multiple copies that are further carved with details. Jewelry suppliers sell wax molded into the basic forms of rings as well as details that can be heat welded together and tubes and sheets for cutting and building the wax models. Rings may be attached to a wax "tree" so many can be cast in one pouring.
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Carnauba Wax
Carnauba Wax
Carnauba (Kahr-new-buh) is just like Candelilla Wax. This popular wax has been used in foods, cosmetics, car products and other places! Like Candelilla Wax, I use small amounts because so little of Carnauba Wax is needed, it also has double the strength of beeswax.
Carnauba wax can produce a glossy finish and as such is used in automobile waxes, shoe polishes, dental floss, food products such as sweets, instrument polishes, and floor and furniture waxes and polishes, especially when mixed with beeswax and with turpentine. Use for paper coatings is the most common application in the United States. It was commonly used in its purest form as a coating on speedboat hulls in the early 1960s to enhance speed and aid in handling in salt water environments. It is also the main ingredient in surfboard wax, combined with coconut oil. Because of its hypoallergenic and emollient properties as well as its shine, carnauba wax appears as an ingredient in many cosmetics formulas where it is used to thicken lipstick, eyeliner, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, deodorant, various skin care preparations, sun care preparations, etc. It is also used to make cutler's resin.
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